Italian Home Design Startup Lovethesign Pulls In $4 Million Series A

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Italian Home Design Startup Lovethesign Pulls In $4 Million Series A

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

They say that the only thing guaranteed in life is death and taxes. But perhaps we should add VCs piling money into furniture and homewear e-commerce startups to the list, not least in Europe. Today it’s the turn of Italian home design startup Lovethesign.

The company has raised just over $4 million in Series A funding, led by United Ventures, in addition to participation from a number of unnamed private investors from the Italian fashion and design industry.

Noteworthy is that Lovethesign plans to use the capital not only to bed down in Europe but also for a subsequent U.S. launch. Along with design-oriented startups, such as Madeindesign, and monoqi, the company also counts more general furniture e-commerce players, including Boston-headquartered and publicly listed Wayfair, as competitors.

Founded in late 2012 by Simone Panfilo, Laura Angius, and Vincenzo Cannata, all three of whom held management positions…

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About big data (in Italy)

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Originally posted on Social media blonde:

Cosa sono i big data? Molti, pur lavorando nel campo informatico, gestionale o economico, tendono a glissare sulla risposta. In Italia sono solo le grandi compagnie telefoniche o agenzie di mercato che dispongono di una struttura interna tale da poter definire questo ambito.

In molte aziende, persino in aziende che si affacciano al mondo dei social media, non è presente una figura professionale capace di analizzare i dati raccolti e di tramutarli in informazioni, previsioni e, addirittura, entrate economiche. Laddove la figura del Big Data Scientist sia presente, il ruolo aggrega tutta una serie di competenze che appesantiscono e distolgono l’attenzione dall’analisi dei dati.

Quando si parla di big data, si deve far riferimento ad una mole enorme di informazioni. Queste informazioni possono essere strutturate o destrutturate. Le fonti possono essere le più disparate, a seconda del campo d’azione di un’azienda, di un ente governativo o di qualsiasi altra struttura…

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LinkedIn Raises Its Game In Social Media With Elevate, An App To Suggest And Share Stories

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LinkedIn Raises Its Game In Social Media With Elevate, An App To Suggest And Share Stories

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

LinkedIn, the social platform with 350 million users where people network for business deals, new jobs, news, and soon to learn a thing or two, is now tapping another business area: social media management.

Today, the company is taking the wraps off Elevate, a paid mobile and desktop app that suggests articles to its users — based on algorithms from its news recommendation services Pulse and Newsle, as well as “human curation” — and then lets users schedule and share those links across LinkedIn and Twitter, with the aim to add more networks like Facebook over time.

Elevate is opening up for a closed, paid pilot starting today. Like Facebook at Work, anyone will be able to download the iOS or Android apps. But only those who are signed up for Elevate (and paying for it) will be able to use it.

The plan is to have Elevate in general availability by Q3 of this year, at which point LinkedIn will also unveil pricing…

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Twitter Cuts Off DataSift To Step Up Its Own Big Data Business

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Twitter Cuts Off DataSift To Step Up Its Own Big Data Business

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

In the push for more revenue growth, Twitter has been building up its business in areas like advertising and commerce, but a move made late Friday night points to another area where the company is setting its sights: big data analytics.

Twitter announced that it will be terminating agreements with third parties for reselling firehose data — the unfiltered, full stream of Tweets and all related metadata that goes along with them.

Instead, it will use its own in-house big data analytics team, which it developed around its acquisition of Gnip in 2014, to seek to build direct relationships with the data companies, brands and others that use Twitter data to measure consumer sentiment, market trends and other moving targets that can be better understood by tracking online conversations — a transition it says it hopes to have completed by mid-August.

DataSift, the biggest company to be affected by Twitter’s move, services thousands of businesses…

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This start-up promised 10,000 people eternal digital life—then it died

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This start-up promised 10,000 people eternal digital life—then it died

Originally posted on Fusion:

Five years ago, a start-up called Intellitar garnered massive media attention by promising its users “virtual eternity.” “We want to give users the gift of immortality,” its co-founder and CEO Don Davidson told reporters when the Huntsville, Alabama-based company launched.

Intellitar was selling its “immortality” service for $25 a month to people who wanted to create a digital doppelgänger that would live on even after their death. Customers uploaded a photo of themselves to Intellitar’s “Virtual Eternity” website, took a personality test, provided a voice sample and then trained their avatars’ “brains”—an artificial-intelligence engine—by feeding it stories, memories and photos. The result, the company said, was an animated avatar that your family, friends, and great-great-grandchildren could talk to, even after you went to the big database in the sky. 

Unfortunately, the company itself was not immortal. It shut down in 2012, with only 10,000 customers signed up. If you visit Intellitar’s website today, you find the digital equivalent of a boarded-up store…

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An Oral History Of That Ultra-Sophisticated ‘Silicon Valley’ Dick Joke

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An Oral History Of That Ultra-Sophisticated ‘Silicon Valley’ Dick Joke

Originally posted on UPROXX:

silicon-valley-dick-joke-oral-history

As fans of the show can attest, Silicon Valley ended its first season (now available on Blu-ray) with the greatest dick joke in TV history. Not only was the whole elaborate thing brilliantly hysterical, but it was also mathematically sound thanks to the show’s technical advisers.

To recap how the show got to this point: the finale brought us to TechCrunch Disrupt, where the Pied Piper team was poised to present their impressive compression algorithm, but they were quickly scooped by the ever-powerful Gavin Belson, who presented a compression speed (coined on the show as the Weissman Score) equal to the one Pied Piper was set to present. Belson warns the audience, “Anyone who tells you their platform is faster than ours better have good lawyers.” Erlich (T.J. Miller) then encourages the deflated team to not give up, declaring, “We’re going to win, even if I have to go into…

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Ancestry.com is quietly transforming itself into a medical research juggernaut

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Ancestry.com is quietly transforming itself into a medical research juggernaut

Originally posted on Fusion:

In 1984, a genealogy geek named John Sittner published The Source, a book meant to unearth and analyze never-before-seen records that genealogists could use to put together family histories with unprecedented detail. Several years later, he founded Ancestry magazine to teach people how they could use public archives and technology—which, back then, meant CD-ROMS and primitive websites and search engines—to build out their family trees.

Sittner sold the company long ago, but three decades after it began, Ancestry.com—the $1.6 billion Internet company that his magazine evolved into—is poised to become one of the most unlikely, yet powerful, scientific tools in the world. For about three years, it’s been collecting and analyzing genetic information through a service called AncestryDNA, and in the process, quietly asking consumers if they’d be willing to share their data with Ancestry for research. To date, it’s banked more than 800,000 samples from customers all over the world, rivaling the database of Google-backed genetics-analysis company 23andMe, which boasts about 900,000…

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